• 19 February 2024

    Australia cricket captain Pat Cummins and British athlete Innes FitzGerald are among the winners of this year's BBC Green Sport awards. Now in their second year, the awards celebrate the athletes, former athletes and organisations working hard to enact and inspire change. Click here to read more.

  • 19 February 2024

    Climate and land use changes are causing significant alterations in global terrestrial water storage, impacting extreme weather events such as floods and droughts, a Griffith University-led study has found. Published in One Earth, the study investigated terrestrial water storage and projected future changes under three different future climate change and socio-economic scenarios: 1) a middle-of-the-road...

  • 19 February 2024

    About 10 percent of human-made mercury emissions into the atmosphere each year are the result of global deforestation, according to a new MIT study. The world’s vegetation, from the Amazon rainforest to the savannahs of sub-Saharan Africa, acts as a sink that removes the toxic pollutant from the air. However, if the current rate of...

  • 19 February 2024

    Hydrogen can help Australia hit net-zero carbon emissions and become a green energy superpower – but only if it gets targeted government support. Click here to read the article from the Grattan Institute and to view their report.

  • 19 February 2024

    This Explainer aims to promote a deeper understanding of key concepts, numbers, and terminology defining the interrelationship between the climate crisis and movement of people within and across borders—to inform greater understanding, and offer principles to guide solutions. It is not meant to be a definitive guide to the ever-expanding body of data, research, or...

  • 19 February 2024

    Book by Jake Bittle Shortlisted for the 2024 Carnegie Medal for Excellence “The Great Displacement is closely observed, compassionate, and far-sighted.” —Elizabeth Kolbert, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Under a White Sky The untold story of climate migration in the United States—the personal stories of those experiencing displacement, the portraits of communities being torn apart by...

  • 19 February 2024

    As many residents will be proud to tell you, the thousand-odd islands that make up the Florida Keys are one of a kind: there is no other place in the world that boasts the same combination of geological, ecological, and sociological characteristics. The islands have a special, addictive quality about it, an air of freedom...

  • 19 February 2024

    Over the past few decades, the migration of people across the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Member States and other regions has expanded – aided by progress in transportation, communication, social networking, and technology.   Environmental factors including climate change is one many complex drivers of migration and displacement in the Southeast Asian region. The...

  • 19 February 2024

    Floods, fires, drought and disasters are already displacing more people globally than conflict. The climate emergency is destroying crops, homes and infrastructure and as the world heats over the coming decades whole cities may become unliveable, forcing populations to move in their tens of millions. How can we manage this unprecedented human movement to achieve...

  • 19 February 2024

    We don’t yet fully understand what global climate tipping points mean for Australia. But we know enough to conclude the impacts of passing one or more tipping points must now be considered. To read more from the CSIRO click here.

  • 19 February 2024

    The record-breaking trend seen for much of 2023 has continued in 2024, with January being the hottest January on record. It is the eighth month in a row that is the warmest on record for the respective time of the year. Sea surface temperatures have been record high for ten consecutive months. To read more...

  • 19 February 2024

    Existing climate mitigation scenarios assume future rates of economic growth that are significantly higher than what has been experienced in the recent past. This article explores how assuming lower rates of growth, in line with the hypothesis of secular stagnation, changes the range of mitigation possibilities. They compare scenarios with moderate and strong policy ambition...

  • 19 February 2024

    We might be coming to the end of summer, but we are certainly still having long, hot, dry days. ABC reporter Selina Ross reported we were in for a scorching summer, and provided tips to prepare for bushfire season, which may still need to be heeded. To read more click here.

  • 19 February 2024

    Climate Crisis: Ideas for Investigative Journalists This Global Investigative Journalism Network resource page aims to encourage more investigative reporting about the climate crisis. In Part 1, they begin with articles that provide concrete suggestions for investigative projects. In Part 2, they have collected challenging commentaries on how the media has handled climate change and what...

  • 8 February 2024

    Click here to see the CSIRO data showing the CO2 emissions at Cape Grim in December 2023

  • 8 February 2024

    Click here for facts on heatwaves - the health-related or economic risks, including increased human mortality, drought and water quality, wildfire and smoke, power shortages and agricultural losses.

  • 8 February 2024

    The calls for climate reparations are rapidly growing in the scientific literature, among climate movements, and in the policy debate. This article proposes morally based reparations for oil, gas, and coal producers, presents a methodological approach for their implementation, and quantifies reparations for the top twenty-one fossil fuel companies. Click here to read more.

  • 8 February 2024

    Climate Impact Research articles reports that 01/26/2024 - Beyond 2°C of global warming, the risk of one climate tipping element triggering other tipping processes in the Earth’s climate system strongly increases. This is the result of a new study by an international team of scientists. Click here to read more.

  • 8 February 2024

    The World Hydro Congress has released The Bali Statement on Powering Sustainable Growth calls forsustainable hydropower to be the backbone of national strategies to build thriving, low-carbon economies bolstered by clean, renewable energy. Click here to read more.

  • 8 February 2024

    Digitalization is often hailed as a savior in the race to preserve nature, but how much idealization does it really deserve? The tech industry contributes its fair share to ecological damage, and it’s time to speak up about the how and why. Click here to read more.

  • 8 February 2024

    The Ecologists reports that nuclear power went backwards last year and shrunk to below 10 percent of global electricity generation despite all the hype about a new nuclear ‘renaissance’. Click here to read more.

  • 8 February 2024

    The European Commission has adopted a set of policy recommendations for Member States to improve and incentivise the return of used and waste mobile phones, tablets, laptops and their chargers. Click here to read more.

  • 8 February 2024

    Farmers for Climate Action release polling showing farmers support for renewables in the regions. Click here to read more.

  • 8 February 2024

    Click here to view a handy site to use to compare vehicle fuels and vehicle types.

  • 1 February 2024

    On 29 January 2024, leading experts from the Food System Economics Commission (FSEC) unveiled a new economic model that maps the impacts of two possible futures for the global food system. Click here to read the full report.

  • 1 February 2024

    In a groundbreaking endeavor, engineers from MIT and China have designed a passive solar desalination system aimed at converting seawater into drinkable water. The concept, articulated in a study published in the journal Joule, harnesses the dual powers of the sun and the inherent properties of seawater, emulating the ocean’s “thermohaline” circulation on a smaller...

  • 1 February 2024

    Climate tipping elements are critical, large-scale components of the Earth system, which are characterized by a threshold behaviour. These systems appear to remain stable with increasing global temperature, but starting at a particular global temperature threshold, very small additional disturbances can 'tip' them into a qualitatively new state. If you imagine a valuable vase that...

  • 1 February 2024

    NSW councils can require new developments be all-electric and gas-free by changing their Development Control Plans (DCPs).  Fr more information click here

  • 1 February 2024

    Critical minerals will be central to our transition to net zero. The world needs them, and Australia has them, writes PETER MAYFIELD. To read this opinion piece click here

  • 1 February 2024

    You’ve almost certainly read about the backup of ships waiting to transit the Panama Canal, which carries 6 percent of all commercial ships worldwide. While the worry among faraway readers may be concerns about supply chain disruptions that could lead to holiday shopping shortages, the problem in Panama is more immediate. The proximate cause of the backup...

  • 1 February 2024

    In Ghana locally made electric bikes are being made for the locals - at an affordable price. Check out their website here

  • 1 February 2024

    Documents shed light on the earliest-known instance of climate science funded by the fossil fuel industry, adding to growing understanding of Big Oil’s knowledge of climate change. Read more here

  • 31 January 2024

    Global renewable energy capacity grew by the fastest pace recorded in the last 20 years in 2023, which could put the world within reach of meeting a key climate target by the end of the decade, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). Click here to read more of this good news.

  • 31 January 2024

    The hottest year in recorded history casts doubts on humanity’s ability to deal with a climate crisis of its own making, senior scientists have said.  As historically high temperatures continued to be registered in many parts of the world in late December, the former Nasa scientist James Hansen told the Guardian that 2023 would be...

  • 13 December 2023

    The most common damage to trees in home landscaping tends to be from cars hitting the lower parts of trees and trucks hitting higher on the trunk and the undersides of major limbs. Trees don’t heal as we do; when they are injured, the wood on the outside of the wound can only creep in...

  • 13 December 2023

    Prudent risk management requires consideration of bad-to-worst-case scenarios. Yet, for climate change, such potential futures are poorly understood. Could anthropogenic climate change result in worldwide societal collapse or even eventual human extinction? At present, this is a dangerously underexplored topic. Yet there are ample reasons to suspect that climate change could result in a global...

  • 11 December 2023

    What is the Premier’s Youth Advisory Council? 11 December 2023 The Premier’s Youth Advisory Council (PYAC) provides an opportunity for young people to meet with the Premier and the Minister for Education, Children and Youth to discuss their ideas on how we can make Tasmania a better place. PYAC is a group of 24 young...

  • 23 November 2023

    EVs are an increasingly popular choice for consumers and business, but in Australia their take-up has been relatively slow. Why? t ARENA, we love electric vehicles (EVs). They’re a key weapon in the battle to remove the 11 per cent of Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions from petrol, diesel and fueled light vehicles. But in Australia,...

  • 23 November 2023

    A team led by researchers at the University of Queensland has developed an innovative method to turn harmful tailings into healthy soil. Tailings, the waste left after extracting precious and critical minerals, often contain harmful chemicals and heavy metals that can pollute soil, water, and even crops. There are over 1800 tailings storage facilities around...

  • 23 November 2023

    The novel photosynthetic biocomposite material is a 3D-printed structure made of a seaweed-based polymer combined with genetically engineered cyanobacteria to produce an enzyme that transforms various organic pollutants into benign molecules. The bacteria were also engineered to self-destruct in the presence of a molecule called theophylline, which is often found in tea and chocolate. Read...

  • 23 November 2023

    A new law to ensure that batteries are collected, reused and recycled in Europe is entering into force today. The new Batteries Regulation will ensure that, in the future, batteries have a low carbon footprint, use minimal harmful substances, need less raw materials from non-EU countries, and are collected, reused and recycled to a high...

  • 23 November 2023

    Working for the past two decades on marine and freshwater projects in the UK, Europe and around the world, the International Marine Litter Research Unit has developed a detailed understanding of the environmental and societal impacts of plastic marine litter. The global outlook of the team’s research has seen them test numerous interventions with industry...